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Vitruvius - book author

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (born c. 80–70 BC, died after c. 15 BC) was a Roman military engineer under Julius Ceasar, generally attributed to be the sole author of the only extant major work from classical antiquity on architecture, De architectura, better known in English as The Ten Books on Architecture.

Vitruvius is the author of books: The Ten Books on Architecture, On Architecture, Volume I: Books 1-5, On Architecture, Volume II: Books 6-10, Architettura: Dai libri I-VII, Dell' Architettura Di M. Vitruvio Pollione, Volume 1, Vitruvius on Architecture, The Civil Architecture of Vitruvius Comprising Those Books of the Author Which Relate to the Public and Private Edifices of the Ancients, Ten Books on Architecture: With Illustrations & Original Designs, Delphi Complete Works of Vitruvius (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics Book 93), Vitruvius: The Ten Books On Architecture (1914)

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02
Vitruvius (Marcus V. Pollio), Roman architect and engineer, studied Greek philosophy and science and gained experience in the course of professional work. He was one of those appointed to be overseers of imperial artillery or military engines, and was architect of at least one unit of buildings for Augustus in the reconstruction of Rome. Late in life and in ill health he completed, sometime before 27 BCE, "De Architectura" which, after its rediscovery in the fifteenth century, was influential enough to be studied by architects from the early Renaissance to recent times.

In "On Architecture" Vitruvius adds to the tradition of Greek theory and practice the results of his own experience. The contents of this treatise in ten books are as follows. Book 1: Requirements for an architect; town planning; design, cities, aspects; temples. 2: Materials and their treatment. Greek systems. 3: Styles. Forms of Greek temples. Ionic. 4: Styles. Corinthian, Ionic, Doric; Tuscan; altars. 5: Other public buildings (fora, basilicae, theatres, colonnades, baths, harbours). 6: Sites and planning, especially of houses. 7: Construction of pavements, roads, mosaic floors, vaults. Decoration (stucco, wall painting, colours). 8: Hydraulic engineering; water supply; aqueducts. 9: Astronomy. Greek and Roman discoveries; signs of the zodiac, planets, moon phases, constellations, astrology, gnomon, sundials. 10: Machines for war and other purposes.
03
Vitruvius (Marcus V. Pollio), Roman architect and engineer, studied Greek philosophy and science and gained experience in the course of professional work. He was one of those appointed to be overseers of imperial artillery or military engines, and was architect of at least one unit of buildings for Augustus in the reconstruction of Rome. Late in life and in ill health he completed, sometime before 27 BCE, De Architectura which, after its rediscovery in the fifteenth century, was influential enough to be studied by architects from the early Renaissance to recent times.

In On Architecture Vitruvius adds to the tradition of Greek theory and practice the results of his own experience. The contents of this treatise in ten books are as follows. Book 1: Requirements for an architect; town planning; design, cities, aspects; temples. 2: Materials and their treatment. Greek systems. 3: Styles. Forms of Greek temples. Ionic. 4: Styles. Corinthian, Ionic, Doric; Tuscan; altars. 5: Other public buildings (fora, basilicae, theatres, colonnades, baths, harbours). 6: Sites and planning, especially of houses. 7: Construction of pavements, roads, mosaic floors, vaults. Decoration (stucco, wall painting, colours). 8: Hydraulic engineering; water supply; aqueducts. 9: Astronomy. Greek and Roman discoveries; signs of the zodiac, planets, moon phases, constellations, astrology, gnomon, sundials. 10: Machines for war and other purposes.
04
Il De architectura di Vitruvio, l’unico trattato di architettura antica giunto sino a noi, è un’opera erudita e raffinata destinata a godere di una straordinaria fortuna in età rinascimentale. Scritto in epoca augustea, un periodo di grandi fermenti, di sperimentazioni e ambiziosi programmi, e soprattutto un periodo in cui l’architettura rivestiva un’importanza straordinaria come strumento di potere, questo libro tratta delle strutture di templi e teatri, di piazze e ginnasi, di porti e case private. Nel tentativo di sistematizzare una materia contraddittoria ed estremamente varia, in esso si stabiliscono le relazioni tra le misure del corpo umano e le dimensioni degli edifici e le loro proporzioni, e si tratta del concetto di simmetria e del sistema modulare. Il testo vitruviano, preceduto da un’approfondita introduzione di Stefano Maggi, viene qui presentato nella preziosa edizione di Silvio Ferri.
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Approximately 2,025 years ago, an aged Roman architect named Vitruvius wrote down on ten scrolls everything he knew about architecture. He presented this work, known today as "Ten Books on Architecture," to Emperor Augustus in the hope of changing what he perceived as a rampant lack of professionalism and educational rigor in the practice of architecture. The "Ten Books," the most comprehensive architectural book written in antiquity and the only such work to survive, is a seminal volume in Western culture and continues to be an important resource. "Viturvius on Architecture" presents not only a new translation of the five books most relevant to contemporary architecture but also new drawings and watercolors that illustrate, for the first time since ancient days, Vitruvis's methods of proportion and composition. Architect and educator Thomas Gordon Smith re-created these finely detailed illustrations directly from the text. Also included are many photographs of historic architecture from Greece, Italy, Turkey, and throughout the Mediterranean region. This new edition of an ancient tome is intended for practical application, as an indispensable reference for classical studies, and as an incontrovertible example of the enduring value of the architecture of antiquity for contemporary education and practice.
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The civil architecture of Vitruvius Comprising those books of the author which relate to the public and private edifices of the ancients. This book, "The civil architecture of Vitruvius Comprising those books of the author which relate to the public and private edifices of the ancients," by Vitruvius Pollio, is a replication of a book originally published before 1812. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible.
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The architect should be equipped with knowledge of many branches of study and varied kinds of learning, for it is by his judgement that all work done by the other arts is put to test. This knowledge is the child of practice and theory. Practice is the continuous and regular exercise of employment where manual work is done with any necessary material according to the design of a drawing. Theory, on the other hand, is the ability to demonstrate and explain the productions of dexterity on the principles of proportion.

1. While your divine intelligence and will, Imperator Caesar, were engaged in acquiring the right to command the world, and while your fellow citizens, when all their enemies had been laid low by your invincible valour, were glorying in your triumph and victory, --while all foreign nations were in subjection awaiting your beck and call, and the Roman people and senate, released from their alarm, were beginning to be guided by your most noble conceptions and policies, I hardly dared, in view of your serious employments, to publish my writings and long considered ideas on architecture, for fear of subjecting myself to your displeasure by an unseasonable interruption.

2. But when I saw that you were giving your attention not only to the welfare of society in general and to the establishment of public order, but also to the providing of public buildings intended for utilitarian purposes, so that not only should the State have been enriched with provinces by your means, but that the greatness of its power might likewise be attended with distinguished authority in its public buildings, I thought that I ought to take the first opportunity to lay before you my writings on this theme. For in the first place it was this subject which made me known to your father, to whom I was devoted on account of his great qualities. After the council of heaven gave him a place in the dwellings of immortal life and transferred your father's power to your hands, my devotion continuing unchanged as I remembered him inclined me to support you. And so with Marcus Aurelius, Publius Minidius, and Gnaeus Cornelius, I was ready to supply and repair ballistae, scorpiones, and other artillery, and I have received rewards for good service with them. After your first bestowal of these upon me, you continued to renew them on the recommendation of your sister.

3. Owing to this favour I need have no fear of want to the end of my life, and being thus laid under obligation I began to write this work for you, because I saw that you have built and are now building extensively, and that in future also you will take care that our public and private buildings shall be worthy to go down to posterity by the side of your other splendid achievements. I have drawn up definite rules to enable you, by observing them, to have personal knowledge of the quality both of existing buildings and of those which are yet to be constructed. For in the following books I have disclosed all the principles of the art.